Memphis Diversity



There are many good reasons to live in Memphis. Indeed, there is a constant stream of new people moving to Memphis. Some for work opportunities but many for a chosen lifestyle. People from across the country (indeed across the world) come here to vacation. Once they return home, many become compelled to pick up roots to make Memphis their permanent home.

The soul runs deep in Memphis. It’s more than just a tourist attraction. The soul and rhythm is in the blood of the people. It’s a city of people making their own way in life the best they know how. It’s a place where people put down roots. A place deserving of people wanting to call it a permanent home and to start a family for generations to come.

When You’re Tired of Driving on Ice

Memphis is not a ski destination. Nor is it a seaside beach town. But it has a big river where the fishing is good. And there are more than enough great golf courses for those wanting to be in the sun. However, Memphis isn’t only about the river, BBQ, the National Civil Rights Museum, music hot spots, and Graceland.

When you live in Memphis, it becomes about the people who live here. Their dreams. The diverse population and their ambitions. People choosing the way they want to live their lives. Still, when you have a problem living with diversity or a problem with church-going people, it might not be for you. And of course, it has its corporate ladder climbers along with those who love the city because the middle class gets by for less money than they can in almost any other major city. This is a city of people, for the people, and by the people.

More Than Beale Street

Although Beale Street is the most talked about section of the city when it comes to tourism, there is much more to the city. Memphis is a city of neighborhoods.

Midtown Memphis is slightly east of downtown and it has a lot going on if you prefer the urban life style – a bit eccentric and unconventional. It features some of the city’s best institutions of higher education and is known for its best architecture. Midtown is also known for its art scene. For those living there, it’s also known for vintage housing, a blend of independent and chain retailers, and high-rise buildings. It is southern urban living at its best.

Colonial-Yorkshire is also known as East Memphis. Further east than Midtown, this part of the city is more about subdivision living than commercial real estate. Although being part of the downtown core, it does have plenty of commercial properties. It includes the neighborhoods of Colonial Acres, White Station-Yates, Sherwood Forest, Normal Station, High Point Terrace, and Belle Meade. This part of the city has some of the largest homes in Memphis, especially in the Walnut Grove area. Still, it’s one of the most affordable neighborhoods near downtown.

Berclair has been a Memphis district since the 1950s. It’s primarily a working class section of the city that was developed with housing for the soldiers returning from WWII. It features many very affordable three and two bedroom homes but also has a strong business district.

Hickory Hill is a middle-class, predominantly African-American community southeast of downtown. Hickory Hill has a community atmosphere of hospitality, community, family, and moral prudence.

Like most major cities, Memphis has some blight. However, much of the city features well-maintained homes and groomed lawns. There continues to be on-going and robust effort to improve the city. Current transitional neighborhoods include Mud Island, Uptown, and South Bluffs. With all of the lifestyle advantages that Memphis offers, it’s worth your effort to learn more about this city of southern hospitality. Come and take a look. You’ll like what you see.

Please comment with your thoughts and experiences about living in Memphis. Also, our weekly Ask Brian column welcomes questions from readers of all experience levels with residential real estate. Please email your questions, inquiries, or article ideas to askbrian@realtybiznews.com.

Author bio: Brian Kline has been investing in real estate for more than 35 years and writing about real estate investing for 12 years. He also draws upon 30 plus years of business experience including 12 years as a manager at Boeing Aircraft Company. Brian currently lives at Lake Cushman, Washington. A vacation destination, near a national and the Pacific Ocean.