A Look At the Top 5 Memphis Real Estate Agents According to HomeLight



According to a recent U.S. News & World Report collaboration with HomeLight to list Memphis, Tennessee’s top real estate agents, Crye-Leike’s Danny Freeman eclipsed all other agents in the region. 

Memphis
Memphis from the river – By Sean Davis

The listing, an unbiased recommendation created using in-depth key performance indicators, ultimately helps home buyers and sellers with the best-qualified professionals in Memphis. The following is a rundown on each of the top 5 agents listed alongside their recent transaction information. I’ve also included a spot check on each agent’s digital presence on Facebook, which readers may find interesting. 

Danny Freeman has been in the real estate business for over 35 years. A top rates agent perenially, Freeman has had 208 recent transactions and is Move Safe™ Certified by HomeLight on account of his COVID-19 strategies for keeping his clients safe. Overall, he’s listed as having created over 600 transactions with an average sale price above 175k. The Freeman Home Team on Facebook shows mediocre engagement, but Freeman’s ratings at Realtor dot com are rock solid. 

Second on the U.S. News list is Keeler William’s Chuck House, who is also a Zillow Premier Agent. House, who has been in the business for almost 20 years. He is also Move Safe™ Certified and has had over 160 recent sales. Overall, House has 412 sales with an average selling price in excess of 260k. A Memphis area resident for over 40 years, House is not the supreme ruler of digital real estate, but I did find his personal Facebook page interesting. Web-wide, the Keeler Williams broker has stellar reviews on every major real estate platform. 

Next on the list Mark Saller of Premier Realty Group. This longtime Memphis agent has superhuman sales numbers with over 2,300 sales (HomeLight shows 68 recently) over the last 10 years, averaging 230 sales per year. He specializes in wholesaling, so his transactions are listed at lower sales prices (69k). A public speaker, Saller’s Reedy & Company Facebook profile is a train wreck which reminds me that almost all of Memphis’ property professionals just don’t get it online.

Melinda Crosslin of Crye-Leike is fourth on the list with 134 recent transitions of between $123,000 and $324,400. With over 20 years of experience, Crosslin has sold over 650 properties, most of which were single-family homes. Eddie and Melinda Crosslin Crye-Leike Realtors Facebook presence is not quite as pitiful as most of the others, but its all but useless for sure. Crosslin’s overall digital footprint seems demonstrative of agents stuck in the age of brick and mortar business, but her record on Zillow is fairly impressive. 

Rounding out the list is Tyler Tapley, another Zillow Premier Agent affiliated with Crye-Leike Memphis. A buyer’s agent primarily, Tapley has more than a decade of experience in the industry. His accolades include Multi-Million Dollar Club Active Member, PINNACLE PRODUCER AWARD WINNER, and Certified Relocation Specialist. He and his wife Meatha’s Facebook presence is, like all the others, simply a placeholder, but one made a lot more interesting because of Mrs. Tapley’s superstar videos showing the couple are indeed real people. 

Interestingly, I ran across a few other top Memphis agents via Top Agents Ranked. The funny thing being, not one of the HomeLight agents was on the email list sent me when I engaged the service that is supposed to connect the best agents with clients. Tops on the list sent me was Michele Johnston – Dream Maker Realty, followed by Verna Littleton of KAIZEN Realty

I’m sure the rating criteria is to blame for the discrepancy here, but in fairness, I thought mentioning these other Memphis professionals appropriate here. Also, none of the agents in either list seem to put much stock in social media, or even their websites. The lone exception being Kaizen Realty. More on this in another report. And as a parting note, it seems like a lot has not changed in Memphis, except that previously profiled area agents don’t seem to have made either one of the lists mentioned in the current story. This seems like another prompt for a follow-up, don’t you think? 

To be continued…