The importance of the TV in home staging



While the TV is often considered to be the centerpiece of any living room, home stagers say that placement of this important appliance is a key consideration, and some say they’re not even sure it belongs there at all.

TV on cabinet in modern living room with lamp,table,flower and plant on yellow wall background,3d rendering

The problem is that if a TV setup feels wrong, it could easily put off buyers and lessen their interest in the home, said Compass real estate professional Hayley Westoff in an interview with Apartment Therapy. That’s because buyers like to try and visualize themselves living in the home, and watching TV is an important part of their lives. So if the TV is in the wrong place, it could make them feel uncomfortable.

TV on cabinet in modern living room with lamp,table,flower and plant on yellow wall background,3d rendering

Still, not everyone sees the presence of the TV as being critical when staging a home. Allison Chiaramonte, a New York-based Warburg Realty agent, said the TV should never be the focus of your efforts.

“While some think keeping a television in the living room at an open house is crucial, others say it takes away from the taste of the home,” Apartment Therapy noted. “It’s a problem that sellers don’t seem to talk about, and its solution isn’t the clearest, either.”

An awkwardly laid out room could add to the challenges of selling a property. For example, lots of people like to put the TV on the wall above the fireplace, if there is one, but if this means it’s placed too high then it could appear awkward. No one wants to sit straining their neck for hours, after all.

“Rearranging the furniture, and putting either a TV or mirror where the TV would go… really helps the buyer visualize what that setup would look like,” Westoff told Apartment Therapy.

It might also be a good idea to simply remove the TV if it doesn’t look right, all the more so if it’s an outdated model.

“If you have a really old, thick, crazy TV, it definitely makes people wonder why it’s not upgraded and wonder what else in the house might not be upgraded,” Chiaramonte told Apartment Therapy.

The best idea, experts seem to compromise on, is to try and have the TV blend in somewhere in the room so that it doesn’t attract any more attention than it should. If it’s mounted in a cabinet, close the cabinet while showing people around. And if the TV happens to be a really enormous one, you could try to tone things down by having it display soundless images showing nature or some other peaceful scenery, so it comes across more as artwork than an entertainment hub.

About Mike Wheatley

Mike Wheatley is the senior editor at Realty Biz News. Got a real estate related news article you wish to share, contact Mike at mike@realtybiznews.com.